Sprang

Sprang is an ancient textile technique where a set of threads are arranged on a frame and crossed with each other in various ways. This technique yields a fabric that has natural elasticity. Its appearance is similar to netting. The main difference is that Sprang is constructed entirely from warp threads. Sprang is made by […]

Read More

Takadai taw-kaw-dye)

Taka = high     Dai = stand The traditional Japanese takadai, the “high stand”, is a larger piece of equipment than is commonly seen outside of Japan. The braider kneels on a board or sits on a stool inside the stand. This version of the takadai was created in the Edo period (1603 -1867) to […]

Read More

Tama (taw-ma)

Traditionally tama are made of hard wood, turned on a lathe to have an hour-glass shape, they are weighted with lead. Weights are used in Kumihimo to exert force on the center (point of braiding). Japanese tama are generally 100gr, while US tama are usually 70gr, other weights are available. The weight of the tama […]

Read More

Warp

We use the term warp when we measure out the threads and prepare them for braiding. Example: “I measured out a warp that was 30″ long and put it on the marudai to make a braid about half that length.” The term comes from the weaving tradition. Warp and weft are the two basic components in weaving […]

Read More

Warping Pegs

  Warping pegs = Used for measuring yarns to be braided.   Pegs are typically clamped to a flat surface such as a table at the desired distance.  Threads are then wound on the pegs until the desired number of ends are reached.

Read More

Weft

The weft is the other basic component in weaving which turns yarns into fabric. The weft is the yarn placed between warp yarns. The simplest structure is called plain weave or tabby where alternating odd and even warp threads are lifted so that the weft goes over 1 under 1. Most woven structures warp and […]

Read More