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Andean Braiding

A style of braiding that originated in the Andean regions of South America (parts of modern day Peru, Ecuador, Chile, Argentina). Andean braiding is a hand-braiding technique that used only two axes of braiding. It has been adapted to the Japanese marudai by Rodrick Owen.  

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Miao (China) braiding stand

Braiding Stand

Miao (China) Braiding Stand In many cultures, some type of equipment is used for braiding. The most common one is a round stand with a weight/counterweight system designed to create enough tension to ensure consistent interlacements. Stands also allow the braider to handle a large number of elements efficiently while being able to braid faster. […]

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Braids

Kumihimo Sampler A braid (sometimes called a plait) is a three-dimensional structure created by interlacing a minimum of three strands of flexible materials such as yarns, wire, straw, leather or hair. In some cultures — such as in Japan — braids are constructed by using multiples of 4 elements (e.g., 4, 8, 12, etc.).  In […]

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Core Stand

The Core Stand was developed by Rodrick Owen to facilitate making traditional Andean braids that are usually made without any equipment. The Core Stand has been designed to be used in conjunction with a Japanese Marudai. The Marudai sits below the four-armed harness of the Core Stand. Active threads are wound on weighted bobbins (tama) […]

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Disk (Disc)

The original foam kumihimo disk was designed by Makiko Tada and made in Japan by the Hamanaka company. Many disks are available in different shapes and sizes and are made by many manufacturers.

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Fingerloop Braiding (outside of Japan)

This braiding technique allows the craftsman to make a braid free-hand without the aid of equipment, although for long braids another person may beat the braid. Loops of threads are attached to a center point. The loops are then placed over the fingers. Interlacements are created by moving loops from one hand to the other […]

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Fingerweaving

In many cultures (e.g., Native Americans) sashes, bands and straps are created using a technique called fingerweaving. No loom is involved in the process. Rather, threads can be arranged on a stick or bar, or knotted to a stationary object at one end. The rest of the threads hang freely. The artisan braids the threads […]

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Hira-dama

Braids made on the Karakumidai use special silk threads wound on bobbins called hira-dama. These are very lightweight tama (roughly 5gr to 8gr) traditionally made by folding washi (paper) around a coin. The silk is attached to a leader thread and wound around the hira-dama. As the braid progresses, lengths of silk are wound off […]

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Interlacement

An interlacement occurs when a yarn is moved through a group of yarns by going over and under them — for instance: over 1 under 1, over 2 under 3, and so on. Braids are typically oblique interlaced structures which distinguishes a braided structure vs. a woven one.

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